Women's March NYC Reflection

by Courtney Lyons


Worrying about what to wear to the Women's March seems like a very frivolous thing in comparison to the monumental goal of the march. Despite this, I still believe that clothing is a means of communication. Your clothing choice can reflect your personality, your beliefs, and your goals. Taking all of this into account, I wanted to wear something that would symbolize why I was participating in the march. 

Both my mother (my marching-mate) and I chose to wear white, a color synonymous with the women's suffrage movement. Founder of my high school's first ever Gender Equality Club and all-around history nerd, I though this was the perfect way to show my support for women's rights. 

The Manhattan Delegation on a Woman Suffrage Party parade through New York. (Credit: Paul Thompson/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

The Manhattan Delegation on a Woman Suffrage Party parade through New York. (Credit: Paul Thompson/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

While New York City's march received a huge turnout and remained primarily non-violent, there was still one major problem with the movement-- it was mainly comprised of white women. Looking around the march, I noticed thousands of white women, who now facing the threat of losing some of their rights, came out to march.  Recognizing my own privilege, I realized that I too, a white woman, had never marched for political change until the situation affected me. Admittedly, it was so amazing that women were able to come together and unite for a common goal. However, I couldn't help but acknowledge my inherent selfishness. I didn't even realize that, with my outfit, I was making a homage to a movement which often excluded black women.   

The whole situation made me truly understand the problem with white feminism. While all women face troubles and injustices, minority, LGBTQ+, and immigrant women face far more. I now understand that, as a white woman, the only way to evoke positive change in the world, and be a true feminist, is to acknowledge your own privilege, use your voice to help elevate others people's voices, and stand in solidarity with those whose issues you may not be able to relate to. 

 

Until next time xx

Courtney